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powerful military, but the best education system? not so much. the survey compares thousands of reports from around the world. u.s. students are average in reading and science, below average in math. the u.s. came in 36 out of 65 developed countries between the slovak republican and lithuania. students in shanghai are more than two years ahead of the peers in massachusetts. the u.s. did better in reading, 24th in the world rankings. number one, shanghai again. science, the u.s. came in number 28 on that list. the top performer? you guessed it. shanghai, china. the u.s. will not get the most improved award. the u.s. fell in all three subjects from 2009 to 2012. u.s. education secretary arne duncan says it points a picture of education stagnation. is the u.s. falling behind or is everyone else getting better? i sat down with candy crowley and christiane amanpour and asked why the u.s. is falling behind. >> what is the problem with education? we keep throwing money at it. the interesting statistics are that the u.s. spends a huge amount of money on education, it doesn't spend as much as ot
-year-olds. the u.s. education secretary arnie duncan calling it stagnation. but before we talk about how to fix the problem, let's look deeper. there might be a lotle less her than meets the eye. they're broken down in connecticut, florida, and massachusetts. in connecticut and massachusetts, two of the richest states in the union were students generally perform better than the worldwide average. the policy substitute said that america lags in social testing. if you were to correct for their massive income inequality, the performance is better than it appears. consider that the top issuer in all three categories was shanghai, a result that gave rise to headlines proclaiming china has having the smartest students. they are just 1.7% of china's population. country, essentially forces many of the children of poor workers to leave shanghai for high school. while testing was done three years ago in china's rural areas, the chinese government only allowed the release of shanghai's scores. it underlies almost every conversation we have about conversation and education policy in america. so
, julie has done on affordable care act. a lot to talk about today including some disturbing education all rankings coming out. >> we'll get to that. we'll begin with the train derailment in new york. federal investigators are turning their attention to the engineer as new revelations of just how fast the train was going. the train was going 82 miles per hour when it took that curve. it should have been traveling at just 30 miles per hour. nbc's tom costello has the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: on the tracks in the bronx mta crews lifted the remains of the broken train as crash investigators went in for a closer look. tons of twisted steel scraped and crushed from sunday's violent crash. the ntsb announced the two black boxes recovered from the train revealed a stunning development. >> train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30 mile-per-hour curve. >> reporter: 82 miles per hour. only six seconds before the train came to a complete second engine power was cutback. then the engineer suddenly applied full brakes. >> when i heard about the speed,
because she lacks a decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own. that should offend all of us. and it should compel us to action. we are a better country than this. >> i mean, when we get to the point where children in no fault of their own are living in these situations and it's just discarded, that's troubling about the spirit of the country and those that are in government, congressman. >> well, a nation that wants to consider itself respectful and decent ought to want to have its citizens live a respectful and decent life. and to do so you've got to pay people a decent wage. we've got to raise the wage from $7.25 to $9. just think about this. in 1938 fdr was successful in getting the minimum wage raised. and from 1938 to 2013 it's raised only $7. they are having difficulty surviving. this nation is not a mean spirited nation. and the majority of the people, i think, go along with what we're saying. the problem is it will never be brought up to a vote here in the house of representatives. >> when the congressman says this is not a mean spirited
the real problem here is public education, if you have never had health insurance before, you don't know how it works and you've never applied for it and never done anything, you need to be educated and there's a whole lot of people out there who have not had health insurance before or how to use it. >> there are a lot of people who don't have computers and a lot of people are watching television about this sort of thing, so you have a real public education problem that goes with any major social change like this. it was no different for social security or for medicare or for the drug benefit under medicare. there's always a lot of education that has to be done. >> we know that there's a renewed sense of confidence certainly coming from the white house and certainly coming from democrats who have been anxious about this, and i know that as of tuesday in your state more than 175,000 residents have enrolled in health care coverage since october 1st and we know since november 14th, enrollments have increased by 55%. in your opening remarks from yesterday's committee hearing from the aca imp
as part of ongoing efforts part of proposals private over public education and too much of a burden on teachers. joining me now president of the american federation of teachers. randy, great to see you. >> great to be with you. >> what motivated this day of action. why do you feel public education is threatened. >> actually as we've seen from the recent results, which shows the united states basically just holding its own and not moving forward, the countries of the world that outcompete us understand that public education has to be the center of education. they have to port teachers and support parents and rich curriculum including arts and music and science. that's what we're calling for here. we're one of any number of groups, student or parent, community groups that says we need a new school not fixated on testing, strategies that create winners and losers but we have to help all of our children achieve and succeed. that's why you see the largest coordinated group of action, 90 in all, set for different parts of time during the day today. >> with race to the top, one of the poli
education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. kand i don't have time foris morunreliable companies.b angie's list definitely saves me time and money. for over 18 years we've helped people take care of the things that matter most. join today. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and rebuild. for companies going from garage to global. on the ground, in the air, even into space. we repaid every dollar america lent us. and gave america back a profit. we're here to keep our promises. to help you realize a better tomorrow. from the families of aig, happy holidays. >>> welcome back to "the lead." he showed the world the true meaning of resilience and during 27 years as a prisoner in his native south africa, emerging from that torment to become his country's first black president, leading his people out of the ugliness that was apartheid. we are today remembering the remarkable life of nelson m
for a country that spends more on education than anything else. it's a key test given to 15-year-olds in 65 countries. the u.s. ranks 36th in math. east asian countries top all three categories in science, the u.s. ranks 28th. only in reading are u.s. students really above average and still pretty much in the middle of the pack. shanghai takes every spot but they hardly represent all of china. it's a slim, slim look about the education system in china. the u.s. slipped in the rankings since 2009. scores are a little changed from the first report in 2000. what's wrong here? the report blames weak u.s. curriculum and education secretary arne duncan calls it a picture of educational stagnation. this is a reality at odds with aspirations to have the best educated work force in the world. he's pushing new common core standards in 45 states. a nationwide drive to standardize education hoping to stem the slide and reenergize american students. brooke? >> we roll on. i'm brooke baldwin here in new york with you today. news after an admission by the engineer at the controls of the speeding train tha
paying? >> well, a job that's better paying calls for a higher education. and, you know, if you don't have that, then it's hard to get a better paying job. and, you know, a lot of people cannot get a better education because of them having to work and take care of a home. >> and, mary, i understand you're also taking care of a daughter with a heart condition, two grandchildren. how old are you, if you don't mind me asking? >> i'm 59 years old. >> and, mary, i imagine then trying to move up in this position, as you say, without the access to education that could enable you to get another job is a huge problem potentially. when you began working all of those years ago, did you have a different outcome in mind? >> yes, i did. i never thought it would get worse. i've always felt that it would get better instead of worse. but it has made a turnaround. >> i want to also, mary, just give you -- let you listen to an interview we had yesterday with jamie richardson. he's a white castle vice president. we said to him, jamie, what would happen if the minimum wage were raised to $15 an hour for
. you went to where. >> never mind. >> oh, my god tell me all these educated people on the set what is he trying to say. >> i went to alabama so i can probably explain it better than anybody else. boy that cuts like a knife. >> tell me, what is the concept. >> we don't know how to kick a field goal when we're at the 15 yard line. >> great game. >> is anyone here? >> kicked the ball -- 59 yard kick but we don't kick a 15 yard field goal. anyway, so let me just say there were a lot of people -- i'm going to say two things so you can't jump on me after i say the first thing. okay. >> okay. >> number one i hate to be harold ford everybody told us back in 1996 when we tried to pass welfare reform and limit the number of weeks, months, years people could be on welfare that we were the most cold hearted hateful people of all time and young children would starve and grand mothers would be thrown out in the snow. we were. we were called the most heartless people of all time. we passed it over two bill clinton wes to. he signed at any time third time. most everybody said that it was a great s
, educate the sick. in the last year i sent 23,000 of my members to 196 countries to assist the poor, care for the sick, educate the next generation. those things get done by churches all the time. and so, to limit the church that you can only speak on this one area, i think it's nonsense. >> what about what he said about gays? he said this, if somebody is gay and seeks the law with goodwill, who am i to judge? this seemed a huge departure from anything i could have remembered any previous pope saying. it flies against what many catholics would say to themselves. you and i debated this before about gay rights, gay marriage, clearly a movement in america as there is around the world towards a much more toll rant attitude towards this. have you in the last two years, since i last i think debated this point with you, have you moved at all now? are you recognizing that there is this seemingly unstoppable movement? >> well, i don't get to change what god says is right and what god says is wrong. i think god is real clear that all sex outside of marriage is wrong. but the issue here is the issue
an economy are blooming for people with access to greater education, more experience in high-tech industry, and not necessarily people who are in our neighborhoods. >> reporter: gabriel metcalf of the san francisco planning and research association understands the apprehension. >> people are really afraid especially renters like me if you lose your apartment, you have to move out of the city most likely. >> reporter: speaking of moving, st
said i voted for reagan i was in canada they said you are such an educated. >> i work with 12,000 kids the best after-school program in the state for inner-city kids 12,000 kids we have a 90 percent graduation rate. john: but because you vote a certain way? >> it is the indoctrination but i keep asking socialism? how does it work? >> in hollywood they don't carry about obamacare does not affect them. john: the biggest cause is saving the earth and climate change. here is a commercial done by harrison ford. >> when rainforest are slashed and burned their releases tons of carbon into the air we breathe. the changes our climate. it hurts. every bit of rain forest cut down over there really hurts us over here. john: what? waxing your chest hair and the of rain forests? it is a gimmick but i would not mind so much i would not mind if they were such a hypocrite but he owns seven airplanes. he once flew the jet to get a cheeseburger. it makes you wish people would confront them. but this brings someone did. >> any other plans to get your chest waxed. are you still flying to get a cheeseburger
the young and vibrant to want to go on the exchange. adds people are more educated about it that's what will happen. that's what we're hoping for for all of this country to lower health care costs. >> i'm intrigued by your first answer where you essentially laid out some of the objectives of the affordable care act. then you said but i'm not too worried about details of the website. isn't that precisely the problem with all of this right now? the objectives were clearly laid out but the details were not well planned. for example, the famous promise made by the president that if you like your insurance plan you get to keep your insurance plan. when, in fact, for 5%, that's not the case. and now people are getting those cancellation notices. the details were not that well thought out. >> agreed that the details did not come to fruition once we began the website. let's be clear, 20% of this country's not based on a website. we'll get the website right. if it's right 30 days later, then we'll still get it right. they had a million go through yesterday healthcare.gov, th
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. you know, ronny... folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. and how happy are they jimmy? i'd say happier than a bodybuilder directing traffic. he does look happy. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. for atrust bufferin, the only non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain reliever formulated with special buffers so it's gentler to your stomach. >>> i could see the stain on the riverbank. i could see them pull my body to the shore. i could see them start cpr. i had no pulse and i wasn't breathing. >> you were unconscious so how do you know that all of this was happening? >> i felt my body break free. and i felt my spirit break free. and i was greeted by these people or these spirits. i could be with them and be going down this incredible pathway and simultaneously look back at the river. when i saw my body, i will say that was the first time that i actually thought, well, i guess i am dead. i guess i really did die. >> you came face to face wit
have health care, kids would be educated, we wouldn't have two million people locked up in jail and we wouldn't have drones destroying the lives of people that we don't know. god bless the pope. and i'm glad the cardinal hears him. i wish other religions would hear them, because there's a vacuum in congress. capitalism is the best thing in the world, but it's not set up to take care of the poor. >> congressman charlie rangel, great to have you here. i think you can easily invest in green ba nananabananas. thanks for your time. >>> joining me now, editor of the "washington post" wonkblog, ezra klein. good to see you, buddy. it was a big weekend for the administration. now they're touting these big gains, coming out with nbc news being able to verify these numbers. 100,000 numbers successfully selected health insurance plans in november, up from the 27,000 in october. and we had jennifer palmieri speak to our chuck todd this morning. i want to play more about what she has to say about promoting this website. >> the question about what you're getting at, i think, is whether or not we're t
crohnsandcolitisadvocates.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. stick with innovation. stick with power. stick with technology. get the new flexcare platinum from philips sonicare and save now. philips sonicare. [ female announcer ] gold bond intensive hand cream. now my hands look great. [ female announcer ] gold bond intensive hand cream. this stuff really works! >>> welcome back to the sports lead. it is pretty obvious what the sports lead is. it is hard to ignore what many people are calling the greatest college football game ever played. auburn's stunning, really unheard of walk-off win over its bitter rival, number one, alabama, formerly number one, alabama. you get a true sense of the agony and the ecstasy through the play by play guys. they probably think they've seen it all and they probably pretty much did, until this weekend. first, here's the play as the crimson tide's broadcasters saw it. >> 57 yards to win the iron bowl. he spots it, kick on the way. it's got length. it is sailing. it is short. it is grabbed about eight yards deep in the e
for one-to-one support and education. >>> welcome back to "the lead." our world lead. paging dennis rodman. the world needs you to check in with your friend kim jong-un and find out what's going on in north korea. rumors are swirling courtesy of south korean lawmakers that kim jong-un's uncle has been hurt. two of his aides have been executed. the uncle is a well known top adviser to the leader and vice chairman of north korea's top military body. we should be clear cnn has not independently verified any of this and the state department says it has no information to share. and we're serious about rodman's diplomacy. he's going back to north korea in a couple weeks for a documentary. when it comes to kim jong-un, what should we make of his ousting his uncle if it's true? is it sign of an internal political power struggle of kim jong-un separating from his father? i want to bring in christopher hill, former ambassador, he was the lead u.s. delegate during the six-party talks with north korea from 2005 to 2009. mr. ambassador, thanks so much. as we said, cnn has not verified this. how trustwo
happening. >> on december 14th, 2012. adam lanza viciously shot 20 children, six educators at that elementary school. now to breaking news from mexico. a stolen truck and the dangerous radioactive materials it was carrying have been found. the truck was taken to radioactive materials to it a nuclear waste facility when it was stolen from a gas station. and just minutes ago, mexico's nuclear safety director saying the missing radioactive material was found close to where the truck was abandoned. it no longer poses a threat. and now to california, an autopsy showing actor paul walker was killed by both the impact and the fire in saturday's car crash. the fast and furious star died when their porsche hit a light pole and a tree. confirming walker was the passenger in the car. also today, universal pictures shutting down production on fast and furious 7, at least temporarily. and now to the deadly cold snap gripping the middle of the country. at least six deaths are blamed on the wintry storm it is pushing through the rockies and the midwest. the storm bringing bitter temperatu
of a fairly high status clan. he would go on to be a lawyer after an incredibly rare education in a white supremacist nation that was explicitly ordered in every single particularity around the oppression, alienuation and d degradation of the black majority of its people. he co-founded a group dedicated to equal rights and ending apartheid. for this activity, the apartheid government, armed with a vast secret police, branded mandela an enemy of the state. mandela was forced into hiding. in a stunning 1961 broadcast, his first televised interview, the 42-year-old activist in hiding spoke with itn's brian wind widlig. >> i asked him what it was the africans really wanted? >> the africans want the franchise on the basis of one man, one vote. >> do you see africans being able to develop in this country without the europeans being pushed out? >> we have made it very clear in our policy that south africa is a country of many generations. there is room for all those in this country. >> mandela emerged from hiding and would be tried along with eight others for treason, a capital crime. all but on
crohnsandcolitisadvocates.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. medicare open enrollment. of year again. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare >>> well, the white house has backed away from a reported statement made two years ago that president obama had never met an uncle who lives near boston. well, it turns out that the president not only knew him, he once lived with him. why so much confusion? cnn's brian todd has more. >> reporter: he's a 69-year-old man who works at a liquor store near boston and he's now caught up in the president's latest political migraine. the man's name, onyango obama, also called omar, the president's uncle. "the boston globe" previously cited the white house as saying the president and hess uncle had never met, but the white house press secretary now says
, his turtle island education center became popular. he taught a thousand people how to live like pioneers. but last year the county told him to shut down. >> he hadn't gotten permits. >> nathan miller heads the county board that oversees the building department. >> people said his camp was unsafe. we don't necessarily know it is unsafe or not. >> mountain man told county inspectors go away. so they came back with lots of people. >> they brought all these different departments from health department, tax people, fire marshall. all of a sudden a whole team, cars or trucks as far as you could see showed up, blocked our driveway, came in with armed guards and took over our home. >> doesn't it seem like overkill? >> not really. they just merely had their pistols in on the side. he had the opportunity, mr. conway did, to cooperate. >> that raid led to this 78 page report on what the mountain man must change. just more government overkill. >> we created this report in anticipation of litigation. >> a lot of it is just crazy, like they have a picture of our dog house for a german shepher
people across the country will be thinking of our children and educators. so tragically taken from us. and wondering how to help. we ask that you consider performing an can the an of kindness or volunteering with a charitable organization in your own local community. we hope that some small pressure of good may be returned to the world. this concludes our family statement. i'd like to add that our family will be lighting a candle on the eve of 12/14, the last night we spent with our sweet charlotte. >> and we will be lighting a candle for our beautiful little girl jessica. >> we will be lighting a candle on behalf jessie mccord louis. >> we're going to light a candle in honor of our daughter emily. >> we will light a candle for my mom dawn. >> we will light a candle for my older sister, victoria. >> we will be lighting a candle for my sweet boy jack. >> we will be lighting a candle in honor of our beautiful girl grace. >> we will be lighting a candle for our gorgeous daughter avile. >> we'll be lighting a candle for our beautiful daughter anna [ speaking foreign language ] >> we will
isn't the top priority here. maybe that's because in france, things like healthcare and education are virtually free. but if you think the french have unlocked the door to paradise, don't start packing yet. [sewing machines whirring] the 35-hour work week, meant to create new jobs, hardly made a dent in unemployment, which still stands at over 10%. and not everyone is thrilled about working even 35 hours. corrine maier, a part-time employee for the state-owned electricity company, has written a book arguing that the french should work less or at least less well. >> the aim is to keep your job without working, or to do... [laughs] it's not to go higher. >> maier's best seller, bonjour, laziness, reveals her secrets on the art of pretending to work. let me read you the subtitle of your book. "the art and necessity of doing the least possible in a corporation." what is the art? >> because you have to be an actor. >> so you're performing? >> yes, you're performing. >> did you have any idea when you wrote this book that it was going to be so popular with french people? >> uh, no. [laug
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. when you do what i do, iyou think about risk.. i don't like the ups and downs of the market, but i can't just sit on my cash. i want to be prepared for the long haul. ishares minimum volatility etfs. investments designed for a smoother ride. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >> up next steve rattner will be here and former governor ed rendell joins the conversation. "morning joe" is
for their grandkids' educations... they chose a partner to help manage their wealth... one whose insights, solutions, and approach have been relied on for over 200 years. that's the value of trusted connections. that's u.s. trust. >>> if company insiders are selling shares as stock prices rise, question is, should individual investors do the same thing? >> sheila tracking who's selling what and tracking a pattern. what are you finding? >> let's start off with the numbers. there's definitely big numbers in november. in fact, $7.4 billion of insider stock was sold by companies. now, yes, you can say this is a trend that happens whenever markets pick up steam or at the end of the year for tax planning purposes. keep in mind, this is an 85% increase from the numbers we saw in october and the highest levels we have seen since may. definitely, a lot of selling happening. here is some big names we saw the most inside selling over the past three months. best buy, $200 million worth of shares sold by insiders over the past three months. amazon saw $400 million worth of shares, including jeff bezos selling a
on the roads the rest of us paid for. you hired workers the rest of us paid to educate. you were safe if your factory because of police forces and fire forces that the rest of us paid for. you didn't have to worry that maraud bands would come and seize everything at your factory and hire someone to protect this because of the work the rest of us did. you built a factory, it built into something or a great idea. god bless, keep a big hunk of it. but part of the underlying social contract is you take a hunk of that and pay forward for the next kid who comes along. >> that harvard law professor won her senate rait race for the senate. she is now senator elizabeth warren. not only that, her populist message defined the election as a whole. >> if you are successful somebody along the line gave you some help. there was a great teacher somewhere in your life. somebody helped to create this unbelievable american system that we have that allowed you to thrive. somebody invested in roads and bridges. if you got a business, you didn't build that. somebody else made that happen. the internet didn't get i
will be thinking of our children and educators, so tragically taken from us. and wondering how to help. we ask that you consider performing an act of kindness or volunteering with a charitable organization in your own local community. we hope that some small measure of good may be returned to the world. >> the families say sdploot let other stories coming in. >>> more than 1700 flights are canceled. many are stranded. temperatures plunged below friezing, even in california, nevada. windchills are 40 below zero in the midwest. snow and ice has blanketed the northeast, including in yonkers, new york. fortunately none of the injuries appeared to be serious. >>> nasa set it's found evidence of a large freshwater lake on mars. samples from the mars curiosity robot that's been collecting data from mars last year revealed the lake may have been around for thousands of years, but eventually turned to desert. >>> i was thrilled to be in attendian at the annual kennedy center honors here in washington, d.c. this year's show brought together entertainers and politicians alike, including the president and
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. and our giant idaho potato truck is still missing. so my dog and i we're going to go find it. it's out there somewhere spreading the good word about idaho potatoes and raising money for meals on wheels. but we'd really like our truck back, so if you see it, let us know, would you? thanks. what? >>> after four days of losses, all three major u.s. stock indices closed up today on news of a better than expected november jobs report. the u.s. added 203,000 jobs in november, that's about 20,000 more than had been expected and the unemployment fell to 7% from 7.3%. that's the lowest level in five years. our senior white house correspondent jim acosta is joining us now. jim, it looks like the job market may, i repeat may finally be hitting some sort of stride. >> that's right, wolf. there's no shortage of new data showing the economy is strengthening but the white house is being careful about taking too much credit for that trend, because too many americans are not feeling it. it's more proof the u.s. economy is heating up. accordin
much in the malls. remember, our customer is fundamentally better educated and wealthier customer. in the malls in general, and, of course, our company is more upscale than the average. it clearly is impacting the big boxes. look at walmart, target, best buy, et cetera, where you see the direct impact. our customer -- our sales have been very strong. >> right. >> the industry, the mall industry has been quite strong over the last few years. >> bill? >> sorry. >> real quick, minimum wage, does taubman have a view on this? >> i don't have a view on it. it's a complicated subject. there's no question that most employees are not on minimum wage when you go the malls. generally above minimum wage particularly when you add commissions. there's no question it'll chill some job growth, but will it increases disposable income? that's out of my pay grade for sure. >> all right. we appreciate your time this morning. >>> all right. up next, budget committee member senator ron johnson on reducing the nation's regulatory burden, the tax system, also health care. he'll join us onset after the br
for their grandkids' educations... they chose a partner to help manage their wealth... one whose insights solutions, and approach have been relied on for over 200 years. that's the value of trusted connections. that's u.s. trust. thrusters at 30%! i can't get her to warp. losing thrusters. i need more power. give me more power! [ mainframe ] located. ge deep-sea fuel technology. a 50,000-pound, ingeniously wired machine that optimizes raw data to help safely discover and maximize resources in extreme conditions. our current situation seems rather extreme. why can't we maximize our... ready. ♪ ♪ brilliant. let's get out of here. warp speed. ♪ ♪ >>> welcome >>> welcome back. a new week on wall street, new batch of stories drawing eyeballs on our website. a look at what's leading the hot list. >> we just had a little excitement here on the website. you know that market downturn you've been talking about, the slide? check this out. we had at least about 6,000, 7,000 people just dive right into the site right into our market coverage, giving us a nice boost at the mar
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, newtown police officers are lecturing on the law enforcement circuit, educating police officers on what not only they say but what they think could be a better process. >> wow. >> that's right, brooke. if you go back to the psychological autopsy we just did on adam lanza, that gave us a plethora of information as to what may be in the minds of these young people, of these mass shooters, so that we can try to avoid this, identify, and work with it to prevent this sort of tragedy, if we can, in the future. >> dr. jeff gardere, steve kardian, thank you both very much. i want to read this from the newtown bee. they said the best way to honor the loves ones and youngsters who lost live s is to take care of someone in the community. in 30 minutes, we'll see how the nation's thinking on gun control has changed since the mass shooting. we'll go in depth about national polls, how everyone is feeling after this? that's at the bottom of the hour. stay with me for that. >> i want to move along and talk about the new details on how actor paul walker and his friend roger rodas died in that car crash
, going to have more resources for important thing like education and public safety. >> okay. in the "chicago tribune" an op ed written by governor scott walker of wisconsin. >> who? who? >> yeah, the guy sending me letters, everybody is welcome heading north. the long and short of it is, he didn't direct what you signed directly yesterday. but what he did underscore is that collective bargaining is no longer part of wisconsin based on act ten they passed, and at the time they passed it, the unemployment was both over 9% in wisconsin and illinois. it's good we slipped under, but wisconsin is 6.5, and they've turned into a slight surplus. you don't have an act ten. you didn't ban collective bargaining. >> no. >> are you going to have similar results, though? >> i believe in collective bargaining. we've created far more jobs than wisconsin. we created about 270,000 jobs. he promised 250,000 jobs. he's created 90,000 jobs in wisconsin. people don't go to sheboygan or, you know, places like that. they come to chicago and illinois. i think it's very important economy, that we work
of the last four months. in november, many were good paying jobs. 40,000 in education and health care. 27,000 manufacturing jobs added. 17,000 construction jobs. >> now we are getting consistent job reports plus 200 and that is positive and positive not only for the economy but it should be forpositive for people should start to feel generally better that conditions are, in fact, improving. >> reporter: on closer look, the unemployment rate for adult men at 6.7%. for women, 6.2%. but the numbers are higher for african-americans and teenagers but they -- >> it's quite clear the u.s. economy pays attention to what washington is doing but this is an unpredictable business and makes it interesting but it makes it hard to know sort of what washington does in the next week, months, or year. what that means for sort of how much the economy can recover and at what rate. >> reporter: while there may be political uncertainty, for the time being, there is only good news for those like recent college grad eddie christian who just landed his first job. >> i look at this as sort of a career, not just a
. as you'll recall, 20 children and six educators were shot and killed in that rampage almost one year ago. >>> an american sentenced to 15 years in a cuban prison makes a direct appeal to president obama. today, marking four years since allen gross was arrested for bringing banned communications equipment into china as part of a state department program to increase internet access. now in a letter to the president, gross says he feels as though the government abandoned him and he believes only president obama's intervention can get him home. >>> all right, kate, fascinating research. indra, pay attention. for the first time shows how different men and women's brains are. it's science, people. scientists scanned the brains of more than 900 young men and women and confirmed something that many of us ladies have suspected. our brains are hardwired to multitask. gentlemen, we love you. your brains are better at focusing on single, complex tasks. >> by fixing what women multitask on. >> left and right brains are much better connected. i'll say it again. left and right brains in women are much
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